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Teaching and learning

A range of suggested learning activities have been provided for each area of study in Units 1–4. It should be noted that the activities included cover a range of the key knowledge and key skills for each area of study, but not all of them. Some activities could be completed within one class and others could be completed over an extended period. They include learning activities that involve group work, class discussion, and practical application of skills. Many of the learning activities could be adapted for use in other areas of study or units, or developed into assessment tasks. All are intended to be examples that teachers will use and/or adapt to suit the needs of their own students. It should be noted that teachers are encouraged to develop teaching and learning activities specifically suited to the needs to their students and context.

Included external links are for teacher reference purposes. They do not constitute VCAA endorsement of the views or materials contained on these sites and teachers need to ensure that any information or activities are appropriately adapted to meet the requirements of the VCE VM Personal Development Skills Study Design (1 January 2023 – 31 December 2027).

Unit 1 and 2

Unit 1

Planning

Timeline ActivityOutcome

Week 1–3

Activity 1A: Introduction to self and ‘25 Facts About Me’ assignment (VCE VM only)

Activity 1B: Introduction to self (same for VCP and VCE VM)

1

Week 4–6

Activity 2A: Interpersonal skills theory and research task (VCE VM only)

Activity 2B: Interpersonal skills theory and research task (same for VCP and VCE VM)

1

Week 7–9

Activity 3A: Reflection on self (VCE VM only)

Activity 3B: Reflection on self (same for VCP and VCE VM)

1

Week 10–13

Activity 4A: Introduction to health and wellbeing (only VCE VM)

Activity 4B: Introduction to health and wellbeing (same for VCP and VCE VM)

2 and 3

Week 14–18

Activity 5A: Plan group project (includes planning for Grade 3 class – only VCE VM)

Activity 5B: Plan group project (same for VCP and VCE VM)

2 and 3

Week 19–20

Activity 6A: Implement and reflect on group project and reflect on the use of technology in relation to project (only VCE VM)

Activity 6B: Implement and reflect on group project (same for VCP and VCE VM)

2 and 3

Teaching

Unit plan descriptor

Students will gain an understanding of interpersonal skills with a focus on teamwork, communication, time management and problem solving. Students will not only gain an understanding through the delivery of content, structured questions and class discussion but through oral presentations, role-plays and other activities. Once students have gained an understanding of the content, they will participate in classroom activities to identify their own strengths and blockers, reflecting on key influences of their strengths and blockers in order to create goals and strategies for self-improvement. Students will also complete an assignment that showcases their own personal identity and emotional intelligence within different contexts, such as education, employment, social life, family and online.

Students will gain an understanding of health and wellbeing (including physical, social and emotional wellbeing) in relation to sugar in foods. Students will be looking at an Aboriginal community and the strategies implemented to reduce sugar in stores as well as the impact of technology (such as TV advertisements of foods) and apps to track food and macronutrients. Students will work in groups to plan and implement a project that focuses on raising awareness about healthy eating among Grade 3 students, with particular attention to the effects of sugar. Each group will create a 20-minute lesson that includes information, an interactive activity, and apps to track sugar intake. The aim of the group work is to enhance students’ interpersonal, leadership, teamwork, communication, time management and problem-solving skills.

Integrated unit suggestion

VPC Unit 1 PDS
This unit is to be integrated with Unit 1 VPC. Please note that all activities labelled with an ‘A’ are related to the VCE VM Unit 1 PDS and all activities with a ‘B’ are related to VPC Unit 1 PDS.

Suggested resources/required equipment

  • Butchers/poster paper
  • Reflective journal
  • Laptops/internet/Office 365
  • Project/Interactive whiteboard
  • Cue cards
  • Worksheets
  • Short clips/PowerPoint presentations
  • Food apps/iPhone/iPad
  • Excursion notes to visit Grade 3 students
Outcome 1: Personal identity and emotional intelligence

Activity 1

Activity 1A: Introduction to self and ‘25 Facts About Me’ assignment

  • Brainstorm concepts related to self.
  • Students complete a set of questions to demonstrate their understanding of positive vs negative concepts related to self (can relate to images portrayed in social media).
  • Students discuss how negative concepts of self can be considered as blockers for personal growth.
  • Students discuss the importance of a positive self-image and how this will enhance personal growth.
  • Students complete a research task where they find a person of interest that is a positive influence (teachers can also provide examples for students; e.g. Michael Jordan).
  • Students present their research task to the class to encourage class discussion.
  • Students complete a ‘25 Facts About Me’ assignment to discuss their own personal identities and emotional intelligences within different contexts, such as education, employment, social life, family and online. Elements of emotional intelligence, such as self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy and social skills, are also included. Students also develop and apply metacognitive skills relating to personal and emotional intelligence during this assignment.

Activity 1B: Introduction to self

  • Students brainstorm concepts related to self.
  • Students complete a set of questions to demonstrate their understanding of positive vs negative concepts related to self (can relate to images portrayed in social media).
  • Students discuss how negative concepts of self can be considered as blockers for personal growth.
  • Students discuss the importance of a positive self-image and how this will enhance personal growth.
  • Students complete a research task where they find a person of interest that is a positive influence (teachers can also provide examples for students; e.g. Michael Jordan).
  • Students present their research task to the class to encourage class discussion.
Outcome 1: Personal identity and emotional intelligence

Activity 2

Activity 2A: Interpersonal skills theory and research task

  • The teacher delivers content about interpersonal skills with the focus on four skills:
    • teamwork
    • communication
    • time management
    • problem solving

      Also:
    • self-awareness
    • self-regulation
    • motivation
    • empathy
    • social skills
    • emotional intelligence
    • resilience
    • effective communication
    • a strengths-based approach
    • problem solving
    • conflict resolution
    • self-management.

Examples of how these can be delivered include: PowerPoint presentations, short clips, role-plays, class discussions, brainstorms, games, case studies.

  • Based on the chosen way in which the content is delivered, students respond to a set of structured questions to demonstrate their understanding.
  • In groups, students are allocated one of the four skills with which to create a role-play/performance, comparing ‘good vs bad’ representations of the skill. Students are given time to plan and practise the role-play/performance before showing it to the class. The teacher may choose to give students multiple concepts to portray in their role-play, as an extension task.
  • Based on the information delivered and activities completed, students complete a research task to apply their knowledge based on interpersonal skills.

Activity 2B: Interpersonal skills theory and research task

  • The teacher delivers content about interpersonal skills with the focus related to the four skills:
    • teamwork
    • communication
    • time management
    • problem solving

Examples of how these can be delivered include: PowerPoint Presentations, short clips, role-play, class discussion, brainstorms, games, case studies.

  • Based on the chosen way in which the content is delivered, students will respond to a set of structured questions to demonstrate their understanding.
  • Students complete an activity where they are given one of the four skills with which to create a role-play/performance, comparing ‘good vs bad’ representations of the skill. Students are given time to plan and practise the role-play/performance before showing it to the class.
  • Based on the information delivered and activities completed, students participate in teacher-led discussions to demonstrate their understanding of concepts.
Outcome 1: Personal identity and emotional intelligence

Activity 3

Activity 3A: Reflection on self

  • Individually, each student traces an outline of themself on butchers paper and annotates it to represent themself (on one side of the outline, they include their strengths and on the other side, their blockers).
  • Individually, students write a personal reflective journal based on their strengths and blockers, discussing/analysing the reasons for them being considered strengths or blockers, and identifying their key influences. Students also identify and describe strategies for further growth.
  • Students then add more information about themselves to their posters, including concepts related to self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, social skills. They can include emotional intelligence relating to self, such as resilience, effective communication, a strengths-based approach, problem solving, conflict resolution and self-management.
  • In groups, students discuss each other’s posters, suggesting ways in which their peers could overcome their blockers or further develop their strengths based on different strategies for self-improvement. Students add these suggestions to their poster. (Students could also write three nice things on a post-it and stick it on peer’s poster).
  • Students use their posters and class discussion to set goals for personal growth and develop plans for achieving them, adding these to their reflective journal.

Activity 3B: Reflection on self

  • Individually, each student traces an outline of themself on butchers paper and annotates it to represent themself (on one side of the outline, they include their strengths and on the other side, their blockers).
  • Individually, students write a personal reflective journal based on their strengths and blockers, discussing/analysing the reasons for them being considered strengths or blockers, and identifying their key influences. Students also identify and describe strategies for further growth.
  • In groups, students discuss each other’s posters, suggesting ways in which their peers could overcome their blockers or further develop their strengths based on different strategies for self-improvement. Students add these suggestions to their poster. (Students could also write three nice things on a post-it and stick it on peer’s poster).
  • Students use their posters and class discussion to set goals for personal growth and develop plans for achieving them, adding these to their reflective journal.
Outcome 2: Community health and wellbeing
Outcome 3: Promoting a healthy life

Activity 4

Activity 4A: Introduction to health and wellbeing – sugar in food focus

  • Teacher delivers content related to health and wellbeing, such as physical, social and emotional wellbeing (shelter, food intake, safety, exercise, sleep, positive relationships, sexual coercion and consent). Examples of how these can be delivered include: PowerPoint Presentations, short clips, class discussion, brainstorms, personal experiences, guest speakers, visits to/from external organisations. Guest speakers could include a member from the local police force where the teacher will have organised content specific to physical, social and emotional wellbeing in young people. The teacher would then find short clips of young people being affected physically, socially and emotionally for comparison. Class discussion focuses on strategies for improving health and wellbeing.
  • Based on the chosen way in which the content is delivered, students develop a mind map to represent their knowledge, adding any additional or personal information/experiences.
  • Once a broad understanding of health and wellbeing has been established, teachers then focus on a particular component of health and wellbeing, such as sugar in food.
  • For students to gain an understanding of the effects of sugar in food, they watch That Sugar Film and respond to a set of structured questions. This forms the basis for the group project. Questions/concepts are based on: sugar content in foods, food labelling, effects of sugar, fast foods.
  • Students analyse the impact of technology on the topic (sugar in food) through the use of various TV advertisements and the way in which the media portrays foods. Students also research various apps that allow them to record their food intake. They record their own sugar intake based on the foods they eat. When looking at their own sugar intake, students assess the reliability, validity and accuracy of information in relation to food advertisement/marketing strategies compared to actual food labelling and facts. In a reflective journal, they evaluate how they now view food and how technology impacts their health and wellbeing.
  • Students complete a case study of The Mai Wiru Foundation, founded to work with an Aboriginal community to remove as much sugar from stores as possible. They watch a clip and answer a series of structured questions related to influences and stakeholders, and record key actions implemented by the community before evaluating these strategies/actions.

Activity 4B: Introduction to health and wellbeing – sugar in food focus

  • Teacher delivers content related to health and wellbeing, such as physical, social and emotional wellbeing (shelter, food intake, safety, exercise, sleep, positive relationships, sexual coercion and consent). Examples of how these can be delivered include: PowerPoint Presentations, short clips, class discussion, brainstorms, personal experiences, guest speakers, visits to/from external organisations. Guest speakers could include a member from the local police force where the teacher will have organised content specific to physical, social and emotional wellbeing in young people. The teacher would then find short clips of young people being affected physically, socially and emotionally for comparison. Class discussion focuses on strategies for improving health and wellbeing.
  • Based on the chosen way in which the content is delivered, students develop a mind map to represent their knowledge, adding any additional or personal information/experiences.
  • Once a broad understanding of health and wellbeing has been established, teachers then focus on a particular component of health and wellbeing, such as sugar in food.
  • For students to gain an understanding of the effects of sugar in food, they watch That Sugar Film and respond to a set of structured questions. This forms the basis for the group project. Questions/concepts are based on: sugar content in foods, food labelling, effects of sugar, fast foods. Students also record their own sugar intake based on the foods they eat.
Outcome 2: Community health and wellbeing
Outcome 3: Promoting a healthy life

Activity 5

Activity 5A: Plan school project to promote healthy eating and create awareness about sugar in food

  • Students, in groups, plan a project to create awareness about the effects of sugar and the importance of healthy eating. Students focus on interpersonal skills to plan the project; in particular, leadership, teamwork, communication, problem solving, communication, critical thinking, decision making and time management.
  • Students use all the information learnt from That Sugar Film to plan and create a 20-minute all-inclusive lesson aimed for Grade 3 students. The completed teacher kit must include: a full 20-minute lesson plan with step-by-step ‘easy to follow’ instructions, a PowerPoint presentation to share knowledge, at least one worksheet, an interactive activity and/or demonstration of how apps can help track food, a healthy recipe book (note: VCP students can make the recipe book for the group), a survey to give out at the end of the lesson.
  • Each student should conduct a meeting with their group during the planning process.

Activity 5B: Plan school project to promote healthy eating and create awareness about sugar in food

  • Students, in groups, plan a project to create awareness about the effects of sugar and the importance of healthy eating. Students focus on interpersonal skills (both strengths and blockers) to plan the project, with a focus on teamwork, communication, problem solving and time management.
  • Suggested assessment tasks include: meeting minutes, a record of consultation with members of the school community to ensure inclusiveness, graphic organiser to represent planning/tasks/goals/timelines.
  • Project examples include: publishing/printing a healthy recipe book, selling healthy snacks, creating fact sheets/websites to promote healthy eating, selling smoothies, creating an infomercial. (VCP only as VCE VM will have a more in-depth project (‘Be the Teacher – Take action in Our School Community’ – more information below). Note: VCP students can assist VCE VM students; for example by finding a series of healthy recipes to create a recipe book for the primary school students.)
Outcome 1: Personal identity and emotional intelligence

Activity 6

Implement and reflect on group project and reflect on the use of technology in relation to project

  • Students participate in implementing their planned project (the teacher kit that includes: a full 20-minute lesson plan with step-by-step ‘easy to follow’ instructions, a PowerPoint presentation to share knowledge, at least one worksheet, an interactive activity and/or demonstration of how apps can help track food, a healthy recipe book and a survey to give out at the end of the lesson).
  • On completion of the project, students complete a reflective journal, evaluating the effectiveness of the project in creating awareness about the effects of sugar (both positive and negative) and strategies for future improvements, as well as reflecting on the interpersonal skills used: leadership, teamwork, communication, problem solving, communication, critical thinking, decision making and time management. Students evaluate their project by gathering data/information based on conversations and surveys. Students also evaluate the effectiveness of using technology when tracking sugar in foods.

Activity 6B: Implement and reflect on project

  • Students participate in implementing their planned project. Project examples include: publishing/printing a healthy recipe book, selling healthy snacks, creating fact sheets/websites to promote healthy eating, selling smoothies, creating an infomercial.
  • On completion of the project, students add to their reflective journal, evaluating the effectiveness of the project in creating awareness about the effects of sugar (both positive and negative) and strategies for future improvements. Students evaluate their project by gathering data/information based on conversations with school community and surveys.

Rubrics

Unit 1, Outcome 1 – Introduction and reflection on self

Unit 1, Outcome 2 & 3 – Health & wellbeing group project

 

Unit 2

Planning

Timeline ActivityOutcome

Week 1–2

Activity 1A: Introduction to community (VCE VM only)

Activity B: Introduction to community (VPC)

1

Week 3–5

Activity 2A: Research members of local community and prepare interview questions (VCE VM only)

Activity 2B: Research members of local community and prepare interview questions (VPC)

1

Week 6–10

Activity 3A: Interview members of the local community, present and reflect (VCE VM only)

Activity 3B: Interview members of the local community, present and reflect (VPC)

1, 2

Week 11–12

Activity 4A: Research issues related to young people and relevant support organisations (VCE VM only)

Activity 4B: Research issues related to young people and relevant support organisations (VPC)

1, 2

Week 14–17

Activity 5A: Plan school project to promote issues faced by young people and relevant local support organisations (VCE VM only)

Activity 5B: Plan school project to promote issues faced by young people and relevant local support organisations (VPC)

1, 3

Week 18–20

Activity 6A: Implement and reflect on project (VCE VM only)

Activity 6B: Implement and reflect on project (VPC)

1, 2, 3

Teaching

Unit plan descriptor

Students will gain an understanding of:

  • community
  • types of communities
  • local and global communities
  • community members and their importance
  • characteristics and benefits of a diverse community
  • citizenship and community (local, national and/or global)
  • characteristics that influence the formation of the community (geography and demographics).

Students will also focus on:

  • characteristics and rights and responsibilities of the community group
  • influence of social, cultural, environmental and economic factors within the community group
  • characteristics that influence the formation of these groups within the community.

Students will gain understanding of these concepts through teacher delivery, structured questions, annotation of pictures of members of the community and community groups, as well as research tasks.

Once students have gained an understanding of the content, they will identify a local member, or particular group within the community that they wish to interview, and develop interview questions. Students will then interview their local community member or group and present their findings to the class before reflecting on the experience.

Focusing on community groups, students will analyse the formation of community and the factors that influence community groups, as well as issues affecting local and national communities, with an emphasis on different perspectives relating to cultural, social, environmental and/or economic issues. Using this information, students will research issues related to young people in the community, as well as research and locate organisations and community support systems that young people can access to gain support related to these issues. Students will then apply this knowledge to plan a ‘Create Awareness Day’ within their school. This project will assist in creating awareness about the issues, local organisations and support systems available to help young people create a sense of belonging.

Students will then reflect on the project and demonstrate their understanding of the benefits of community involvement, as well as reflecting on their interpersonal skills. The focus of the reflection will be to discuss strategies relating to solving the chosen issue and how these strategies can promote inclusion and cohesion of diversity within the community. Students will also need to reflect on the interpersonal skills used during the planning and implementation of the project, such as: communication, critical thinking, problem solving, time management, decision making, leadership and teamwork.

Integrated unit suggestion

VPC Unit 2 PDS
This unit is to be integrated with Unit 2 VPC. Please note that all activities labelled with an ‘A’ are related to this Unit 2 VPC and all activities with a ‘B’ are related to the VCE VM Unit 2 PDS.

Suggested resources/required equipment

  • Photos of members of the community
  • Reflective journal
  • Laptops/internet/Office 365
  • Project/Interactive whiteboard
  • Cue cards
  • Worksheets
  • Short clips/PowerPoint presentations
  • Local community members
  • Cameras
  • Paper/coloured printing/scissors/coloured pencils and paper
  • Access to poster-making technology (e.g. Canva)
  • Tables to set up stalls
Outcome 1: What is community

Activity 1

Activity 1A: Introduction to community

  • The teacher delivers and expands on content related to concepts of the community: types of communities, both local and global; community members and their importance; citizenship and community (local, national and/or global); characteristics that influence the formation of the community (geography and demographics); groups within the community. Examples of how these can be delivered include: PowerPoint presentations, short clips, class discussion, brainstorms, guest speakers.
  • Based on the chosen way in which the content is delivered, students respond to a set of structured questions to demonstrate their understanding.

Activity 1B: Introduction to community

  • The teacher delivers content related to concepts of the community: types of communities, both local and global: community members and their importance. Examples of how these can be delivered include: PowerPoint presentations, short clips, class discussion, brainstorms, guest speakers.
  • Based on the chosen way in which the content is delivered, students respond to a set of structured questions to demonstrate their understanding.
Outcome 1: What is community

Activity 2

Activity 2A: Research members of local community and prepare interview questions

  • Students focus on community groups to analyse the formation of community and the factors that influence community groups. To achieve this, teachers show students a set of photographs of groups within the community, which have been annotated to focus on: rights and responsibilities of the community groups; influence of social, cultural, environmental and economic factors within the community groups; characteristics that influence the formation of these groups within the community.
  • Students research and identify ways to connect with members of their local community or community groups. They then choose a local member of the community or community group to interview.
  • Students invite/ask for permission to interview the community member/community group, for example by writing an email, writing a speech for a phone call/asking in person, writing a formal letter.
  • Students create interview questions that encompass concepts related to community as previously examined.
  • Examples of active participation involving community members or community groups may include: excursions, incursions, zoom calls, guest speakers. They may involve a retirement village, an aged care facility, a local shopping centre, family members.
  • Note: teachers may choose to conduct mock interviews in preparation, asking for volunteers from the local community.

Activity 2B: Research members of local community and prepare interview questions

  • Students focus on local and global members of the community and their significance. In order to achieve this, teachers show students a set of photographs of members in the community, which have been annotated to focus on: rights and responsibilities of the community members, community engagement and contribution as well as a sense of belong for community members.
  • Students research and identify ways to connect with members of their local community. They then choose a local member of the community or community group to interview.
  • Students invite/ask for permission to interview the community member/community group, for example by writing an email, writing a speech for a phone call/asking in person, writing a formal letter.
  • Students create interview questions that encompass concepts related to community as previously examined.
  • Examples of active participation involving community members or community groups may include: excursions, incursions, zoom calls, guest speakers. They may involve a retirement village, an aged care facility, a local shopping centre, family members.
  • Note: teachers may choose to conduct mock interviews in preparation, asking for volunteers from the local community.
Outcome 1: What is community
Outcome 2: Community cohesion

Activity 3

Activity 3A: Interview members of the local community, present and reflect

  • Once interview questions have been created, students then interview their local community member or community group. Students need to record the interview, ensuring permission is granted.
  • Students write the responses to their interview questions, which they then use to make a digital presentation to be presented to the class.
  • Students write a reflective journal about the experience, focusing on both positive and negative aspects as well as strategies for improvement, with an emphasis on personal and emotional growth. In their reflective journals, students analyse how their community member or community group contributes to their community.

Activity 3B: Interview members of the local community, present and reflect

  • Once interview questions have been created, students interview their local community member. Students may also choose to record the interview, ensuring permission is granted.
  • Students write the responses to their interview questions.
  • Students write a reflective journal about the experience, focusing on both positive and negative aspects as well as strategies for improvement, with an emphasis on personal and emotional growth.
Outcome 1: What is community
Outcome 2: Community cohesion

Activity 4

Activity 4A: Research issues related to young people and relevant support organisations

  • This module begins with class discussion and brainstorming activities related to issues concerning young people, and considering relevant organisations that provide support systems in the community. Discussion should include the challenges faced by local and national communities such as: cultural, social, environmental and/or economic issues. An example of mental health issues could include the organisation Beyond Blue.
  • Students then conduct their own research and choose an issue relating to young people in the community as well as a local community organisation or community support system that can assist young people with the issue identified. Research should include the impacts of the issue on social cohesion and health and wellbeing within the community. Students also need to look at barriers and enablers that the local community has to consider when working together in solving the issue, as well as strategies to foster diversity, inclusion and cohesion within the local community.
  • Students present this information to the class as part of the lead-up to planning and implementing a ‘Create Awareness Day’.

Activity 4B: Research issues related to young people and relevant support organisations

  • This module begins with class discussion and brainstorming activities related to issues relating to young people, and considering relevant organisations that provide support systems in the community. An example of mental health issues could include the organisation Beyond Blue
  • Students then conduct their own research and choose an issue relating to young people in the community as well as a local community organisation or community support system that can assist young people with the issue identified.
  • Students present this information to the class to assist in deciding what group they would like to be a part of when planning for a ‘Create Awareness Day’.
Outcome 1: What is community
Outcome 3: Engaging and supporting community

Activity 5

Activity 5A: Plan school project focusing on issues faced by young people and relevant local support organisations

  • Once students have presented their chosen issue and organisation/support system, they form groups to plan a ‘Create Awareness Day’. The purpose of this project is to create awareness among the school community about organisations and local support systems that may assist them with issues they may be facing.
  • The planning needs to focus on ways of promoting the organisation/support system to the school community. An example is setting up a stall in the yard to provide information in the form of fact sheets, posters and/or flyers. Activities need not be limited to this; students may choose to organise guest speakers for particular classes or focus groups within the school community.
  • During the planning stages of their project, students present their work using a graphic organiser that includes: overview of project, roles and responsibilities of group members, meeting minutes, resources needed, etc. Students should apply critical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making and metacognitive skills when working independently and/or collaboratively during the project, as well as leadership, teamwork and time-management skills.

Activity 5B: Plan school project to promote issues faced by young people and relevant local support organisations

  • Once students have presented their chosen issue and organisation/support system, they form groups to plan a ‘Create Awareness Day’. The purpose of this project is to create awareness among the school community about organisations and local support systems that may assist them with issues they may be facing.
  • The planning needs to focus on ways of promoting the organisation/support system to the school community. An example is setting up a stall in the yard to provide information in the form of fact sheets, posters and/or flyers. Activities need not be limited to this; students may choose to organise guest speakers for particular classes or focus groups within the school community.
  • During the planning stages of their project, students present their work using a graphic organiser that includes: overview of project, roles and responsibilities of group members, meeting minutes, resources needed, etc.
Outcome 1: What is community
Outcome 2: Community cohesion
Outcome 2: Community cohesion

Activity 6

Activity 6A: Implement and reflect on project

  • Students implement their planned project to create awareness.
  • On completion of the project students write a reflective journal, evaluating the effectiveness (both positive and negative) of the project in creating awareness about the chosen issue and organisation/support system in promoting understanding about the benefits of community involvement. Students could evaluate the project by gathering data/information based on conversations within the school community, by conducting surveys, and then suggesting strategies for areas of improvement. Students also need to evaluate the strategies relating to solving the chosen issue and discuss how these strategies will promote inclusion and cohesion within the community. Students also need to focus on self-reflection in relation to the interpersonal skills used during the planning and implementation of the project, such as: communication, critical thinking, problem solving, time management, decision making, leadership and teamwork.

Activity 6B: Implement and reflect on project

  • Students implement their planned project to create awareness.
  • On completion of project students write a reflective journal, evaluating the effectiveness (both positive and negative) of the project in creating awareness about the chosen issue and organisation/support system in promoting understanding about the benefits of community involvement. Students could evaluate the project by gathering data/information based on conversations within the school community, by conducting surveys, and then suggesting strategies for areas of improvement. Students also need to evaluate the strategies relating to solving the chosen issue.

Rubrics

Unit 2, Outcome 2 – Community interview & research

Unit 2, Outcome 3 – Community project

 

Unit 3 and 4

Unit 3

Planning

Timeline ActivityOutcome

Weeks 1 –2

Activity 1: Social labels

1

Weeks 3– 4

Activity 2: Team protocols

3

Weeks 5– 7

Activity 3 : What is a leader?

2

Weeks 8– 10

Activity 4: People who have changed the world

1, 2, 3

Weeks 11– 20

Activity 5: Group project

1, 2, 3

Teaching

Unit plan descriptor

Be the change you want to see!

The context of this unit is for students to plan a selected project. The unit commences with students engaging in a range of tasks that enable them to reflect on how their personal skills contribute to a team’s effectiveness. They unpack the concepts of social awareness and analyse a range of interpersonal skills. Students look at traditional views of leadership. They consider the advantages and disadvantages of each style, making connections to styles of leadership they may have experienced in their own workplaces. Students evaluate these concepts through the stories of some extraordinary people known to them, before they conduct a case study of a significant individual. Students work in a small team to complete this task to practise their own team and leadership skills. Students create a personal plan to incorporate some of these concepts into their own practice throughout the implementation of the project.

Students work in a team to plan a project. This may be undertaken as a whole class , in small groups or individually. Where the project is undertaken individually, the student would be expected to engage with other members of the school or wider community who , depending on their role, might then be considered part of their team. Examples of projects might include organising a year-level carnival, organising end- of-year events for the Year 12 cohort, organising a sporting event for Year 7s, organising a VM information event, organising a MasterChef Dining Event for parents, organising a class camp.

Integrated unit suggestion

VCE VM Unit 3 Literacy: Additional leadership research tasks and oral presentations could form part of the Literacy assessments.
VCE VM Unit 3 WRS: The short activity requiring students to analyse leadership in their own workplace would link to Unit 3 WRS. Students could analyse the difference between authoritarian leadership and workplace bullying.

Suggested resources/required equipment

  • Project Rockit – social labels workshop
  • Canoeing excursion
  • Indoor rock climbing
  • Escape room excursion or incursion
Outcome 1: Social awareness and interpersonal skills

Activity 1

Social Labels

  • Students participate in the Project Rockit – Social labels workshop. This workshop builds students capacity to identify their own personal values and those of others; students identify that confidence and resilience are required to take risks in learning; and they identify the individual actions they can take to make the world a better place.
  • Students watch the film, Remember the Titans . Students participate in class discussion evaluating examples from the film of social awareness, empathy and interpersonal skills. Students begin to identify team skills such as communication and problem solving. Students complete the table below:
  • Students begin to reflect on the social awareness and interpersonal skills required to contribute to an effective team and create an ideal ‘team member’.
  • Students watch two videos: the 60- minutes report and a TED Talk on Turia Pitt (other motivational people could be selected in addition or as alternatives).
  • Students continue to engage in class discussions, identifying characteristics of social awareness such as resilience and empathy.
  • Students create a personal action plan which identify the interpersonal skills they intend to focus on for improvement, with suggested strategies.
Outcome 3: Effective teamwork

Activity 2

Team protocols

Students learn how to develop team protocols. Teams share personal strengths and areas for improvement based on their action plans. Students develop a list of team protocols for each activity. These skills can be used whenever students are asked to work in a team.

  • Team building activities: these activities could be completed as starter activities as you work through the major project or as whole lessons or excursions. At the end of each activity students would reflect on the team and leadership skills observed and make suggestion to improve team effectiveness.
    • Canoeing excursion
    • Escape room excursion or incursion
    • Stranded on a desert island activity
    • Mystery holiday activity
    • Team trivia
    • Bank robbery problem-s olving task
    • The Life boat – Who will you save activity
Outcome 3: Effective teamwork

Activity 3

What is a leader?

  • Students brainstorm on post-it notes all the qualities of a leader. They share this information as a class.
  • Paired research task: Students are given a photo of a famous leader. Students are to find the following information about their leader:
    • Full name
    • Profession/job
    • Background
    • Positive Impact on Society
    • The personality traits which make them a great role model/leader 

Students identify which qualities they will improve on in the next 12 months. 

Styles of leadership

  • Students are introduced to the following traditional leadership styles: autocratic, charismatic, laisse faire, transformational and distributed.
  • Students are put into five groups. A team leader is selected from each group. The team leader is given one the styles of leadership discussed. Each team is instructed to build a spaghetti bridge, which must hold a certain weight and be the tallest. The team leader must use the mystery leadership style while working with the team.
  • At the end of the challenge, the team members reflect:
    • What was the style of leadership allocated?
    • What were the strengths and weaknesses of this style of leadership?
    • Was you team successful? Why or why not?
    • How did this style of leadership motivate you personally?
    • How did this style of leadership frustrate you personally?
    • Share any strategies you used to have your own influence within the team?
  • For the leader:
    • Was this a natural style of leadership for you?
    • Do you think this style of leadership was able to motivate your team successfully?

Leadership in your workplace

  • Discuss as a class – what styles of leadership have you encountered in your own workplaces? How have these styles of leadership motivated or frustrated you personally?
  • Create a PROS and CONS table for each style of leadership
Outcome 1: Social awareness and interpersonal skills
Outcome 2: Effective leadership
Outcome 1: Social awareness and interpersonal skills

Activity 4

People who have changed the world

  • In groups of two to three students research two people who have ‘changed the world’. This might include individuals who have made changes in some of the following areas:
    • Women’s equality
    • Promoting diversity for cultural groups or LGBTQI groups
    • Indigenous issues
    • Environmental issues
    • Economic improvements
    • Other
  • In teams students develop a plan to tackle how to find and present the information. There are some starter questions below, but as a team students should also develop five to ten additional inquiry questions. Students can choose how to present this information. It may be a PowerPoint, electronic poster, brochure, video or other format.
    • How has each individual made the world a better place?
    • What are the qualities they exhibited to lead the change?
    • How could you incorporate some of these qualities into the future you?
  • After conducting the presentation, students reflect on the following:
    • What was your role in the team?
    • How would rate your team and leadership skills on a scale of 1 to 5?
    • How do you think your team members would rate you?
    • Did your team encounter any problems? If so what was your role in finding a solutions?
    • What skills do you think you would like to set as improvement goals for the next team task?
Outcome 1: Social awareness and interpersonal skills
Outcome 2: Effective leadership
Outcome 1: Social awareness and interpersonal skills

Activity 5

Group project

  • Students begin this project by getting to know the members of their team. The team members share their personal strengths and areas for improvement. The team then develops a list of team protocols.
  • The team brainstorms the projects and creates a project planner. The project planner should clearly highlight who is responsible for each milestone.
  • The team develops a range of effective planning tools: project planner, risk assessment, communication log, meeting agendas and minutes.
  • Throughout the project, students would be encouraged to meet regularly to reflect on their progress and give other team members feedback
  • Evidence to be collected of the team project would be:
    • Portfolio of evidence demonstrating self-awareness, team and leadership skills
    • An overall reflection on the team’s achievements
    • A self-assessment – this could be a template, a more formal written piece or it could involve regular check ins with teachers and a record of observation.

Rubrics

Unit 3, Outcomes 1-3 – Be the change

 

Unit 4

Planning

Timeline ActivityOutcome

Weeks 1 – 4

Activity 1: Climate change introduction

1

Weeks 5–10

Activity 2: Application of knowledge: Planning portfolio

1

Weeks 11–13

Activity 3: Implementation of project: Pre-project day / planning involvement

2

Weeks 14

Activity 4: Implementation of project: Day of project involvement

2

Weeks 15–18

Activity 5: Climate change project: Reflective PowerPoint of planning and implementation process

3

Weeks 19–20

Activity 6: Climate change project: Oral PowerPoint presentation

3

Teaching

Unit plan descriptor

This unit is based on the topic of climate change. Students gain an understanding of the human influence on climate change, and plan and implement a project to help create awareness and combat the issue. To gain an understanding of climate change students research their selected issue, and the teacher delivers content using a range of resources. Once students have gained an understanding of the issue, they can either complete a class project where the teacher separates the project into smaller mini-projects that fit the theme, or, based on student skill level and teacher confidence and flexibility, the teacher may allow students to come up with their own project idea, and complete separate projects. Once the project brief is established, students need to start planning their project, including objective, resources, timeline, budget, stakeholders, roles and responsibilities, and apply interpersonal skills where necessary. Once students have planned their project, they can start with the hands-on aspects of the project, ensuring all resources are either made or sourced, and participating in the project. After the project is completed, students reflect on the project in general and their team’s performance. This can be achieved through general observations, conversations and surveys. Students complete an end-of-project PowerPoint presentation, which they present to the class including information about climate change, the planning and implementation process, and their reflections.

Integrated unit suggestion

VCE VM Literacy: Once students have gained an understanding of a range of text types suitable to specific audiences or for specific purposes in Literacy, they can then draw on this knowledge when developing their chosen medium to create awareness about climate change and involving community groups or members for the project. This is particularly relevant to Unit 3, Outcome 2, where students create their own informational text that reflects vocational experience, and Unit 4, Outcome 1, where students are engaging with literacy for advocacy, producing texts for the chosen community group and climate change. Unit 4, Outcome 2 can be integrated as students showcase their learning and present their entire project through the planning, implementation and reflection phases.

Suggested resources/required equipment

Equipment needed will be related to project chosen. Examples include (please see Activity 2 for project ideas):

  • Climate change PowerPoints and movies (e.g. 2040 or Before the Flood – ClickView is a good resource for movies)
  • Trees for planting and gardening tools
  • Materials to upcycle and equipment to make items for Fashion Show
  • Networking with local community groups/ members
  • Materials for signage (e.g. paper, printer, laminator, etc.)
Outcome 1: Planning a community project

Activity 1

Climate change introduction

Students investigate and analyse an environmental issue (climate change/enhanced greenhouse effect), as well as the cultural, economic and social issues surrounding climate change/the enhanced greenhouse effect. Students first need to gain an understanding of climate change and be able to compare the enhanced and natural greenhouse effect.

To gain an understanding of the topic, the teacher uses, but is not limited to, PowerPoint presentations, short clips and movies such as 2040 and Before the Flood.

To demonstrate their level of understanding students need to complete:

  • an annotated diagram of the natural vs enhanced greenhouse effect including the types of radiation, the steps/scientific process involved, greenhouse gases and natural and human sources of greenhouse gases
  • a series of structured questions based on the PowerPoint, 2040 and Before the Flood
  • an online questionnaire where students answer a series of questions to identity their own carbon footprint and write about individual strategies they could use to reduce their carbon footprint
  • a structured essay where students use the following subheadings:
    • What is climate change
    • Enhanced vs natural greenhouse effect
    • What are greenhouse gases and how do they contribute to the greenhouse effect
    • Human and natural sources of greenhouse gases
    • Impacts of the enhanced greenhouse effect on the environment
    • Impacts of the enhanced greenhouse effect on humans
    • Strategies to combat climate change as an Individual
    • Strategies to combat climate change regionally and globally
    • Consequences of climate change if we don’t act

Note: to complete this essay, students need to draw on their knowledge, from the teacher’s PowerPoint/resources and movies 2040 and Before the Flood, and from independent sources and appropriate references analysing the area of concern, including articles, reports, data, tables and/or diagrams.

Outcome 1: Planning a community project

Activity 2

Application of knowledge: Planning portfolio

Students plan and design a community project to create awareness and help solve the issue. A brainstorm activity/class discussion is conducted to discuss possible project ideas.
Note: possible project ideas can include, but are not limited to (multiple projects can occur based on student level/ engagement):

  • Sustainability Fashion Show (students upcycle to make items of clothing which can be sold at auction to raise money for an environmental charity of choice)
  • Tree planting (students research community groups and get involved with tree planting/revegetation groups)
  • Spread the word about climate change (students get involved with the local primary school or retirement village and educate individuals about climate change and ways in which they can help on an individual basis. Students can also do this within their own school community, making signage and posters in which their school community can reduce their carbon footprint, e.g. signage stating to open blinds and turn off lights placed near light switches and individual choices at home that can help, e.g. turning off standby power)
  • Earth Hour (students can organise the school to have their very own Earth Hour, whereby all electricity is not in use for 1 hour for the entire school. During this time the students can go around to individual classes and create awareness).

Note: based on student skill and knowledge level as well as level of engagement, multiple projects can be run. As this is a Unit 4 subject, students should already have experience with planning and implementing projects, therefore this project can be completed in an autonomous and student directed manner.

To assist the planning process, students complete a planning portfolio and apply communication, critical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, planning and metacognitive skills when working independently or collaboratively.
When planning, the portfolio needs to include the following:

  • describe the objectives of the project
  • identify the key resources related to the project such as time, materials and technology
  • identify relevant stakeholders and community partners and propose appropriate methods to engage or consult with community stakeholders
  • identify key actions and strategies to be implemented in the project
  • allocate team member roles and responsibilities
  • develop a budget for the community project
  • develop a timeline for the community project
  • develop a contingency and risk management plan
  • identify evidence the team will collect during the implementation of the community project.
Outcome 2: Implementing a community project

Activity 3

Implementation of project: Pre-project day / planning involvement

Students need to actively participate in the pre-project day implementation. This includes the following:

  • Resources to create awareness for the issue (theory component). When creating awareness about climate change, students need to choose a medium and identify and describe the issue in detail, including background information, causes, impacts, data/evidence, local, regional and global strategies. This can be in the form of a flyer, brochure, factsheet, website, etc. Students also need to make resources to promote the project.
  • Resources to complete the project (physical component/ items). Students need to actively participate to ensure that all resources are sourced for the day of the project. These resources may include such items such as plants, signs, gardening tools, etc. Based on the project chosen, students also need to make items needed for the project, such as items for the Fashion Show, using upcycled materials.
  • Team meetings to ensure that all members of the team are aware of planned objectives/ goals/ tasks as well as to check-in with each other and discuss progress and ensure timeline/ deadlines are being met, as well as apply a contingency plan if required.
  • Invitation for community group involvement in project once relevant stakeholder/s have been identified. This is a formal invitation and needs to be planned, drafted and submitted to the teacher before delivery. It also needs to include contact details for the stakeholder to respond. It is best if multiple stakeholders are identified and invited to participate as a contingency plan.
  • Liaising with internal or external community/ charities once letters have been sent and request for involvement has been accepted. Students need to ensure that evidence is collected for all correspondence made with stakeholders, for example emails, date of phone conversation, including what was said and who they spoke with.
  • Surveys need to be created and multiple copies made in order to collect feedback of community project. Students need to ensure that questions are relevant and appropriate to collect both qualitative and quantitative data. The surveys will be distributed on the day of the project and collected by students for their reflection.
Outcome 2: Implementing a community project

Activity 4

Implementation of project: Day of project involvement

Students apply their interpersonal skills to realise the project, for example:

  • leadership
  • communication
  • critical thinking
  • problem-solving
  • decision-making
  • planning
  • metacognitive skills
  • working both independently and collaboratively.

Students also need to ensure that surveys are distributed and collected at the end of the project.

Outcome 3: Evaluating a community project

Activity 5

Climate change project: Reflective PowerPoint of planning and implementation process

Students report on their climate change project. To do so, students make a PowerPoint presentation that demonstrates appropriate structure and conventions of a report and describes the planning, implementation and evaluation.

The teacher explains the structure of the report and its importance, and provide students with a template and criteria sheet to complete the PowerPoint. It is important that photos are taken at each stage of the planning and implementation stages of the project. These photos will be used in the PowerPoint, each one being annotated.

An example of what criteria to include in the PowerPoint
(Note: this includes all components of the project)

  • Knowledge of climate change (overview, causes, greenhouse gases and sources, impacts on humans and the environment, local, regional and global strategies)
  • Planning of project (including annotated photos)
  • Objectives of project (overview and aim of project including purpose/ goals)
  • Resources (including any companies/prices/rooms/equipment used and cost.
    Note: include individual pictures of all resources, stating how they will be used)
  • Resources for theory component of project (theory-based medium chosen to create awareness, e.g. posters, flyers, etc. Include a copy of the chosen medium)
  • Resources for physical component of project (physical items, e.g. plants, signs, etc. Include annotated photos)
  • Stakeholders (a list of all stakeholders researched and involved in project, including all contact details, invitation letter for involvement and evidence of all communication with them)
  • Key actions and strategies (a caption – description and purpose of task/phase/goal/step, including annotated photos of each)
  • Team member roles and responsibilities (Stating who in your group oversaw that task, evaluating their performance, using both positive and negative factors. Note: include a pictures of group members completing the task. Also include evidence of meetings with team – photos or meeting minutes)
  • Budget (an itemised price list of all resources needed including a total, stating whether budget was over, under or on budget)
  • Timeline (start and completion dates of all tasks/goals)
  • Contingency plan and risk management plan risk assessment (Contingency plan in case there were any issues. Assessment of all hazards and risks associated and management to avoid, prevent or resolved)
  • Copy of survey (include a copy of blank survey distributed)
  • Implementation of project (incl. annotated photos)
  • Participation in project (including photos of what you and your team did on the day)
  • Examples of surveys (include completed surveys as examples)
  • Graphing of survey data collected (present the data from the surveys in a logical way, e.g. graph for quantitative data and write about your findings based on the surveys/graph)
  • Evaluation of project (use the data from your surveys and your own personal experience and opinion to evaluate the project and your team, including both positive and negative aspects and suggest strategies to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the project)
Outcome 1: Planning a community project

Activity 6

Climate change project: Oral PowerPoint presentation

Students present their PowerPoint presentations to the class.

Students need to ensure that they are well prepared by creating cue cards and practising with peers.

Rubrics

Unit 4, Outcome 1 – Activities 1 & 2

Unit 4, Outcome 2 – Activities 3 & 4

Unit 4, Outcome 3 – Activities 5 & 6